Tuesday, October 21, 2014
softerworld:

A Softer World: 1161
(nobody sees the real me. i hope.)
buy this print • support our patreon

softerworld:

A Softer World: 1161

(nobody sees the real me. i hope.)

buy this printsupport our patreon

bootsnblossoms:

femininefreak:

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman-Hughes, 1972 and 2014

Both by Dan Bagan

Wanna see my cry like a baby? Ask me who these women were.

Hughes’ father was beaten nearly to death by the KKK when she was a kid, and what does she do? Become an activist to try and stop that from happening to other people. She raised money to bail civil rights protesters out of jail. She helped women get out of abusive situations by providing shelter for them until they got on their feet. She founded an agency that helped women get to work without having to leave their children alone, because childcare in the 1970s? Not really a thing. In fact, a famous feminist line in the 70s was “every housewife is one man away from welfare.”

Then she teamed up with Steinman to found the Women’s Action Alliance, which created the first battered women’s shelters in history. They attacked women’s rights issues through boots on the ground activism, problem solving, and communication. They stomped over barriers of race and class to meet women where they were: mostly mothers who wanted better for themselves and their children.

These are women are who I always wanted to be.

(Source: 8-bitfiction)

michaelanthonynatale:

Mø - “Red In The Grey”

ohladybegood:

incomprehensiblelentils:

fanaticalqueergeek:

Killing Off The Queers

Dead Lesbian Syndrome. Bury Your Gays.  This trope has a few names, and although I like to think it was fading, this 2014-2015 TV session have proven me oh so wrong.  We have had no fewer than 3 queer female characters be killed off in 3 weeks. Let me repeat that- THREE queer women in THREE weeks. That’s bordering on ridiculous. Of course, that’s almost as bad as killing off 9 queer women in 2013 TV season alone. 

This is not a case of “They are being treated like every other character.”  I would accept that, if we had enough queer women on TV to have a fair sample, but we don’t.  The GLAAD “Where are we on TV” report just came out, and we are almost exactly where we were last year.  3.8% of scripted characters on TV are LGBTQ. This means that way more of a percentage of gays got killed off than the typical straight white male.  This is not equal representation. This is quite literally, “Bury Your Gays” (with a mix of Fridging.)  And it needs to stop.   

The excuses behind these characters deaths are also trite and hard to swallow. 

Isabelle Hartley (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D):  Isabelle was killed off during the season premiere (where she was also introduced!) Her sexuality was never discussed on the show, ever though in the comics she is canonically queer.  Then she was killed off.  THEN the writers gave an interview stating they didn’t talk about her sexuality because they “Would’ve been known as the people who killed off two lesbians on a show.”  

Well, that makes me feel SO much better. Not mentioning her sexuality does not make her automatically straight. Beyond the fact that indicates that “hetero” should be the default sexuality, tons of fans of the show know that in the comics, she WAS gay. Not saying it doesn’t make it so. 

Leslie Shay (Chicago Fire): Leslie was killed off in the first episode of the season.   The writers admitted that it was to further the storyline of everyone else- basically saying she was way less important then everyone else. If killing someone is the only way to further someone’s character development, that’s just plan bad writing. 

Sara Lance (Arrow):  Sara, knows as the Black Canary, was also killed off during the season premiere.  Are we sensing a theme here?  The writers claim it was to further a storyline, but it also sets the stage for her sister, Laurel, to take the mantle of Black Canary (as she is in the comics.) 

I’m all for Laurel being the Black Canary, but did they really have to kill off her sister to do it? Is there some unwritten rule that two women can’t be superheroes at the same time? Would the world end or be sucked into a black hole?  They already have both Oliver and Roy as two of the heroes on the show. Could Sara not have trained Laurel?  Once again, it’s terrible writing. There could have been 100 other ways to have done this that would have been less cliché and painful for the LGBTQ community. 

It’s already hard enough to find myself in TV characters (we won’t even get into the lack of Butch representation,) but to give all the queer kids out there a sliver of hope  and then take it away? Not cool. How many queer kids are watching these shows thinking “Look, they are just like me!” only to watch them get brutally killed? This just reinforces the stereotype that queers don’t deserve happy endings, especially when there are SO FEW of them already on TV. 

Well, you know what? We do deserve happy endings, and good story lines, and to be more than a way to further some straight person’s character development. And it’s time for TV to start reflecting that. 

Also earlier this year SHIELD killed off Victoria Hand, who is a lesbian in the comics.

True Blood killed off Tara Thornton this year, too. 

Monday, October 20, 2014
fyeahsuperheroes:

stephanie-hans:

it’s already all over internet but I just wanted to post it myself. This is the alt cover  I dit for Thor. First one I ever did fully traditionnally. I was a bit nervous about it ^^

This is awesome!

fyeahsuperheroes:

stephanie-hans:

it’s already all over internet but I just wanted to post it myself. This is the alt cover  I dit for Thor. First one I ever did fully traditionnally. I was a bit nervous about it ^^

This is awesome!

fuck-yeah-feminist:

divasdishblog:

"People are perfectly happy to see women as sex objects, but the actual biologic of our bodies is apparently gross and unmentionable."
- Our Bodies, Ourselves.

Female bodies must always be:
naturally beautiful (but hairless)
sexually available (but not slutty)
curvy (but not skinny, and certainly not fat)
fertile (but not menstrual)
So… good luck?

fuck-yeah-feminist:

divasdishblog:

"People are perfectly happy to see women as sex objects, but the actual biologic of our bodies is apparently gross and unmentionable."

Our Bodies, Ourselves.

Female bodies must always be:

  • naturally beautiful (but hairless)
  • sexually available (but not slutty)
  • curvy (but not skinny, and certainly not fat)
  • fertile (but not menstrual)

So… good luck?

Sunday, October 19, 2014

What do we say to the god of death?

  • Persephone: it pisses me off that people ignore the hymn to my mom that talks about how great we are together and instead believe this is against my will
  • Persephone: I mean I have you tied to the bed how would I not be into this
  • Hades: please can we not talk about your mom during sex it's really uncomfortable

bloomingbanana:

/randomly posts a painting walkthrough and runs away —

comicsalliance:

MARGUERITE SAUVAGE’S WONDER WOMAN AND THE SLOWLY CHANGING FACE OF COMIC BOOK FASHION
By Juliet Kahn
Fashion matters. Your experience with superhero comics might have led you to believe otherwise, but I assure you, fashion matters—and should matter particularly to people who read, write, and/or draw comics. Crazy, right? Who would have guessed that such an omnipresent element of our daily lives, used to communicate everything from our politics to our career goals to the circumstances of our laundry cycle should be of consequence to a visual medium!
Fashion—by which I mean all clothes and all styles, not just what you might find folded in the juniors’ department—is capable of communicating basically anything to the audience. A character’s unemployment might be evidenced through their yoga pants and ponytail; their ambition through their pressed pantsuit; their hobbies through a paint-flecked smock. Generally, American comics get those most basic of rules right, but anything beyond that—anything not strictly tied to a vocation or place—is fumbled. Clothes are bland when they aren’t embarrassingly out of date. Women’s fashion is a bizarre mélange of male fantasies, ranging from obvious fetishwear to….heavily fetishized selections from the 2007 Delia’s catalog. Thong straps are hiked high above brutally low-waisted jeans, high heels are worn with absolutely everything, and crop tops are issued upon the first sign of puberty. I mean, I say this as someone who owns two: they aren’t that popular.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

MARGUERITE SAUVAGE’S WONDER WOMAN AND THE SLOWLY CHANGING FACE OF COMIC BOOK FASHION

By Juliet Kahn

Fashion matters. Your experience with superhero comics might have led you to believe otherwise, but I assure you, fashion matters—and should matter particularly to people who read, write, and/or draw comics. Crazy, right? Who would have guessed that such an omnipresent element of our daily lives, used to communicate everything from our politics to our career goals to the circumstances of our laundry cycle should be of consequence to a visual medium!

Fashion—by which I mean all clothes and all styles, not just what you might find folded in the juniors’ department—is capable of communicating basically anything to the audience. A character’s unemployment might be evidenced through their yoga pants and ponytail; their ambition through their pressed pantsuit; their hobbies through a paint-flecked smock. Generally, American comics get those most basic of rules right, but anything beyond that—anything not strictly tied to a vocation or place—is fumbled. Clothes are bland when they aren’t embarrassingly out of date. Women’s fashion is a bizarre mélange of male fantasies, ranging from obvious fetishwear to….heavily fetishized selections from the 2007 Delia’s catalog. Thong straps are hiked high above brutally low-waisted jeans, high heels are worn with absolutely everything, and crop tops are issued upon the first sign of puberty. I mean, I say this as someone who owns two: they aren’t that popular.

READ MORE